Captioning and Subtitling Services

Archive for the ‘Staff’ Category

A Christmas Gift Idea for Kids

Books make great holiday gifts for kids, and numerous reports link leisure reading to increased vocabulary, school success, and heightened empathy. But when you’re shopping for a child who is deaf or hard of hearing, what are the best choices?

Kids like reading about characters whom they resemble, and in their diversity statement, the Children’s Book Council states, “All children deserve to see themselves in story.” So with that in mind, we’d like to introduce you to books which feature deaf or hard-of-hearing characters in primary roles. And since everyone loves a good story, consider these for the hearing children on your list as well!

El Deafo, by Cece Bell. This graphic memoir tells the story of a profoundly deaf child whose new hearing aid makes her feel like a superhero, hence the book’s title.   Kirkus Review calls this “a humorous and touching graphic memoir about finding friendship and growing up deaf.” Ages 8 and up.

Leading Ladies, by Marlee Matlin and Doog Cooney. This book, number three in the “Deaf Child Crossing” series, tells the story of Megan Merrill, a deaf fourth-grader who is auditioning for the part of Dorothy in a musical version of The Wizard of Oz. Will she get the part, or will it go to her best friend, Julie? Kirkus Review says, “This rare glimpse into the life of a child growing up deaf is an invaluable contribution to juvenile fiction.” Ages 8-10.

Silence in the Wild: A Summer in Maine, by Dale C. Jellison.   Jake Graham, a deaf boy of twelve, is adjusting to his first summer at camp when he finds himself alone in the wilderness without benefit of hearing aids. This coming of age story, published in 2014, is not yet reviewed. Ages 11-13.

The Flying Fingers Club Mystery Series, by Jean F. Andrews.   Matt, who is deaf, teaches his friend Donald to sign, and together they form the “Flying Fingers” club to solve mysteries. Titles include “The Flying Fingers Club,” “Secret in the Dorm Attic,” and “Mystery of the Totems.”   Booklist says, “The underlying theme, that two boys can have a close friendship regardless of one having a disability, comes through as Donald learns sign language and paves the way for other classmates to befriend hearing-impaired Matt.” Ages 8-11

To spread additional cheer amongst deaf and hard-of-hearing children, visit the web site of the Described and Captioned Media Program for their holiday list of accessible media. Titles include “The Gift of the Magi,” “Seven Candles for Kwanzaa,” and “In the Month of Kislev.”

Christmas ElfCompuScripts Captioning offers effective communication to assist you with compliance of the Americans with Disabilities Act by offering closed captioning and subtitling services to public and private venues.  CompuScripts Captioning is endorsed by the Described and Captioned Media Program, which is administered by the National Association of the Deaf and funded by the U. S. Department of Education.  Achieving DCMP “Approved Captioning Service Vendor” status is a prestigious honor in the captioning industry.  Of those who participate in the rigorous evaluation process to acquire Approved Vendor status, only half actually earn the distinction.  CompuScripts Captioning also enjoys the distinction of being a YouTube Ready captioning vendor through DCMP.


Sports Captioning Interview

As the University of South Carolina heads towards its last home football game of the 2014 season, we’d like to introduce you to one of our most experienced captioners, Joniel. This is the second season of Gamecock football for which Joniel has provided stadium captioning. The addition of stadium captioning at Williams-Brice Stadium allows the deaf and hard-of-hearing community to enjoy the public address announcements, song lyrics, videos, halftime performances, and anything else that is heard over the P.A. during breaks in the action. Below, you’ll find Joniel’s thoughts on love (of sports), loss (of one of her favorite players), and the “magical” names on the Gamecock roster.

CompuScripts Captioning: How did you get into closed captioning?

Joniel: I got into closed captioning when, during my work as a deposition reporter, I was encouraged by my then-boss (who is a true sister of my heart) to embrace the discipline, purchase captioning software, and provide services for a new client of her firm that required captioning. This occurred during the mid-1990s.

CC: What types of programs have you captioned during your career?

Joniel: My initial focus was government: council meetings, school boards, commissions. It has expanded to financial calls, news programs, sports-centric programs, both games and recaps, educational, devotional, local entertainment, cooking, and local-interest programs. I caption high school and college football games.   I also use my captioning skills for onsite CART (Communication Access Realtime Translation) presented to either individual participants who need text of a meeting or to a large audience. I have captioned the gamut of programs!

CC: You mentioned sports-centric programming. Are you a sports fan generally? What are your favorite teams?

Joniel: I am a sports fan. My particular interest is the Cleveland Indians because I caption their games often, and I admit to having a private connection: When I was a teenager, my sister’s husband was an outfielder on one of the Cleveland Indians’ farm teams. I avidly follow their progress each year, whether I caption their games or not. My 15-year-old grandson is quite a good little league player. I also follow the Seattle Mariners and Seahawks, as well as the Cleveland Browns and, of course, the USC Gamecocks. I have become a football fan mostly because I am now involved in captioning the Gamecocks’ home football games, and that has led me to follow and appreciate other teams.

CC: What are the greatest challenges in stadium captioning?

Joniel: The challenges relate mostly to not having a “view” of what the audience is seeing. I communicate with [CompuScripts’ owner] Debbie Dusseljee via text message, along with the control person onsite.

CC: What do you enjoy most about stadium captioning?

Joniel: I enjoy the football games I stadium caption because I feel more like a spectator than a captioner. The actual game-time captioning is less stressful because the audio I receive is a synopsis of the action rather than a play-by-play version, as is the case for network sports captioning. However, my pregame and halftime responsibilities include assembly, proofreading, and presenting a detailed script of the ceremonial events which occur during each game.

CC:   Have you developed any favorite Gamecock players while captioning?

Joniel: Since I have captioned the Gamecocks for two years, I’ve developed favorites for each year. I thought Jadeveon Clowney (of course!) was a HERO last year. Sadly, he’s graduated. This year Sharrod Golightly and Pharoh Cooper are my favorites, mostly because I think their names are magical. I have no way of “seeing” other than through “hearing.”

CC: What have you learned about the University of South Carolina and Gamecock football while providing the stadium captioning?

Joniel: I have learned that the tradition of USC Gamecocks football is as close to a spiritual belief as I’ve ever witnessed. The Gamecock Crow, 2001 Space Odyssey, Sandstorm, the Mighty Sound of the Southeast, as well as the student-athletes all factor into the tradition, and the spectacle becomes complete and absorbing. It is welcoming and nurturing as well.

Joniel's Captioning Suite

Joniel’s Captioning Suite and Stenomachine

Is your sports franchise interested in bringing captioning to your stadium’s deaf and hard-of-hearing audience? CompuScripts Captioning has been providing stadium captioning since 2011. We’d love for you to contact us about providing stadium captioning to your team’s fans!

Caption Editor Profile

Meet Jesika, one of our youngest postproduction closed captioning editors.

Caption Editor

Caption Editor

CC: Tell us about your background.

Jesika:  I was born in Washington.  I made my way to Germany in college, reinforcing my love of gray, cloudy skies.  I graduated from Columbia College, a private liberal arts women’s college in Columbia, S. C., with a B. A. in English with a minor in art.

CC:  How did college prepare you for postproduction closed captioning?

Jesika:  At Columbia College, I received instruction on the craft of writing and editing.  I also worked as a writing tutor.  Between grammar classes and hands-on journalism experience, I learned how to form sentences properly, which makes it easier to break them down for transcription.  Punctuation is important in quality closed captioning.  A poorly punctuated sentence can cause confusion for the viewer.

CC:  What do you like best about postproduction closed captioning?

Jesika:  I like having the opportunity to play around with words.  Some of the programs we caption at CompuScripts Captioning are especially entertaining; I never thought I’d become a fan of old Westerns!

CC:  CompuScripts is a YouTube Ready Qualified Vendor.  Do you have any favorite YouTube videos?

Jesika:  Some YouTube videos I’ve enjoyed in the past include Evolution of Dance, Maru, and wacky music videos.  MysteryGuitarMan’s videos are also fun.  The stop-motion animation of an Excelspreadsheet is amazing!

CC:  Do you have any hobbies?

Jesika: My current interests are writing, studying languages, and designing t-shirts.  I enjoy urban fantasy books and television, and “Star Wars” has always been one of my top movies.  Lately, I’ve been listening to music by The Starlight Mints and Culcha Candela.  I’m also a foodie.  A Whole Foods just opened nearby, and it’s hazardous to the wallet!

CC:  If you ever join the circus, for what act will postproduction closed captioning prepare you?

Jesika:  Juggling.  In postproduction closed captioning, you’re always multitasking.  Between transcribing video, editing scripts, and putting time code to captions, there is a lot involved in producing quality closed captions.

CC:  CompuScripts can deliver postproduction closed captioning in pop-on, roll-up, realtime, or subtitle formats.  Do you have a favorite format to watch?

Jesika:  I prefer pop-on captions.  I like how pop-on allows for speaker identification.  I also like how the on-screen placement of the pop-on caption can affect the meaning of the caption.  Because of the editing involved and the attention to time cuts, the pop-on caption becomes a part of the video.

CC:  CompuScripts produced a YouTube sample video about the South Carolina Lizard Man.  If you were charged with our next YouTube video, what would it be?

Jesika:  There was talk in the office about a YouTube video featuring grammar zombies.  While I don’t know if zombification is the way to go, I think some sort of lexical battle is in order.

CC:  If CompuScripts Captioning ever becomes a musical workplace, a la television’s “Glee,” what song will you sing?

Jesika:  “Interjections!” from “Schoolhouse Rock.”   As it explains, interjections are great for when you’re happy, sad, frightened, mad, or glad.  That pretty much covers any sort of day.

CC:  Describe your dream postproduction closed captioning job.

Jesika:  A hyperkinetic cartoon or sci-fi action series.  There would never be a dull moment!

Look Who Stopped by NRB Booth 659

NRB Expo

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