Captioning and Subtitling Services

Posts tagged ‘closed captions’

2015 FCC Captions Deadlines

As we usher in a new year, CompuScripts Captioning would like to update our closed captioning clients on changes in regulations regarding Internet video. Internet video programming distributors should already be acquainted with The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, or CVAA. First implemented in 2012, the CVAA mandates the captions of most Internet video programming. Compliance with the CVAA is monitored by the Federal Communications Commission.

Since March 2012, prerecorded, unedited video programs has required captions when shown for the first time on the Internet. Live programming, near-live programming, and prerecorded, edited programming has required Internet captions since 2013.

In 2014, video programming distributors had 45 days to caption for the Internet previously televised captioned programming. Beginning March 30, 2015, that deadline shrinks to 30 days; for example, a captioned program that is televised on March 30, 2015, must appear with closed captions when shown on the Internet by April 29, 2015. Beginning in 2016, a captioned televised program must appear with captions when shown on the Internet within 15 days to remain compliant.

2015 FCC Mandates

New Year Mandates

CompuScripts Captioning has been working with our clients to ensure compliance with the CVAA since
its implementation in 2012. Previous blogs have addressed Internet captioning regulations and
FCC deadline changes, and future blogs will address changes in the required quality of captions. In addition to Internet video, CompuScripts Captioning offers closed captioning and subtitling services for broadcast and DVD media. Our services are customized for your particular workflow and deliverables, as well as your budget. For assistance on how all of your video programming might meet FCC compliance deadlines, or to request a quote, contact our Caption Coordinator, Stacey Wilson, at swilson@compuscripts.com or 1.888.849.9698.

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Netflix and NAD Agreement

ImageAfter two years in federal court, Netflix, Inc. and the National Association of the Deaf have submitted a joint Consent Decree which will ensure closed captions in 100% of Netflix streaming content by September 30, 2014.

As of October 9, 2012, the date of the decree, Netflix affirmed that 82% of its streaming content was available with closed captions.  Netflix must now achieve a captioned rate of 90% of its streaming content by September 30, 2013.  Additionally, by 2016, new on-demand streaming content must be available with closed captions within seven days of its launch.  In meeting the deadlines specified in the decree, Netflix agreed to prioritize its most highly-viewed programming for the inclusion of closed captions.

Commenting on the agreement, Howard A. Rosenblum, CEO of NAD, said, “The National Association of the Deaf congratulates Netflix for committing to 100% captioning, and is thrilled to announce that 48 million deaf and hard of hearing people will be able to fully access Netflix’s Watch Instantly services.”  Within Netflix, “Watch Instantly” refers to the company’s streaming content services.

Neil Hunt, Netflix Chief Product Officer, also responded positively.  “We have worked consistently to make the broadest possible selection of titles available to Netflix members who are deaf or hard of hearing and are far and away the industry leader in doing so.  We are pleased to have reached this agreement and hope it serves as a benchmark for other providers of streaming video entertainment,” he said.

To read the National Association of the Deaf’s announcement of the Consent Decree in its entirety, go to http://www.nad.org/news/2012/10/netflix-and-national-association-deaf-reach-historic-agreement-provide-100-closed-capti

To read the Consent Decree in its entirety, go to http://dredf.org/captioning/netflix-consent-decree-10-10-12.pdf