Captioning and Subtitling Services

Posts tagged ‘communication access realtime translations’

Cochlear Implants and Classroom CART

In our June 2013 blog, we discussed the use of CART, or Communication Access Realtime Translation, by Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing students in college classrooms.  This month, we look at a group of students whose need for CART services might not be immediately apparent:  those with cochlear implants.

Many people incorrectly believe that once a Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing student is fitted with a cochlear implant, hearing is restored, and the need for classroom accommodations disappears.  This belief may be due to a misunderstanding of the difference between hearing aids and cochlear implants.  Hearing aids, which attach to the outer ear, amplify sounds.  Cochlear implants, which are surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear, bypass damaged parts of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders explains how a cochlear implant works:

  1. A microphone picks up sound from the environment.
  2. A speech processor arranges sounds gathered from the microphone.
  3. A transmitter and a receiver/stimulator convert signals from the speech processor into electric impulses.
  4. An electrode relays these electric impulses to the auditory nerve.
Communication

Communication

From there, the impulses travel to the brain, which recognizes them as sound.  This new hearing, however, is different from biologic hearing and takes time to learn.  As the regulatory agency of medical products and procedures, the Food and Drug Administration reminds educators that students need time to adjust to their cochlear implants, and they do so at different rates.  On its website, the FDA states, “During the accommodation period, students need language input from all the sources they used before their implants.”  These may include sign language interpreters, note-takers, or speech-to-text services such as CART.

It is not necessary for the CART provider to be in the classroom with the student.  In this scenario, the classroom instructor wears a wireless microphone during the lecture, and the student’s laptop is connected to the microphone base station.  The student and the CART provider connect via SKYPE, and the highly skilled provider uses a stenomachine as well as special software to convert the instructor’s speech to text. This text is then streamed to an Internet browser-based application, giving the student instant access to the lecture content on his or her laptop.

And students are not the only users of cochlear implants who may benefit from CART services.  CART is frequently used in business meetings, religious services, and medical evaluations by people using cochlear implants.

If you are a student who uses a cochlear implant and are interested in CART accommodation in the classroom, have your college’s disability services office contact CompuScripts Captioning.  If you are a representative of a college disabilities services office and are in need of a CART provider for a student using a cochlear implant, contact CompuScripts Captioning’s president, Deborah Dusseljee, at ddusseljee@compuscripts.com, or call 1.888.849.9698.

JOIN US AT ALDACON 2012

CART Services to be Donated at Conference for Late-Deafened Adults

Onsite CART

Columbia, S. C., October 17, 2012

CompuScripts Captioning, Inc. is proud to announce that they will be exhibiting their services at ALDAcon 2012, a conference hosted by the Association of Late-Deafened Adults, October 17-21 in Columbia, S. C.  In addition to greeting visitors in the exhibition hall, CompuScripts will also be donating two sessions of CART. Communication Access Realtime Translation services provide captioning of the spoken word in the classroom, boardroom, courtroom, and other environments for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community.

Deborah Dusseljee founded CompuScripts to offer services to various entities in need of effective communication with predominantly hard-of-hearing and Deaf persons to include real-time closed captioning, offline and live display captioning, CART, subtitling, and text-streaming.  Deborah was instrumental in launching the closed captioning of local news programming in the Columbia area through her work as the Shatter Silence Committee Chair for Quota International’s local chapter.  Later, Deborah worked with the South Carolina Association of the Deaf in launching realtime closed captioning services for the South Carolina Senate and House of Representatives, as well as four news stations located throughout the state.  Since its founding, CompuScripts has provided complimentary CART services to local charitable organizations.

“Today, CompuScripts’ community involvement extends to supporting the Oliver Gospel Mission, Harvest Hope, Heartworks, and Pets, Inc.,” Ms. Dusseljee said. “We believe this helps us stay connected with South Carolina area residents and helps to create a more tightly-knit community.”