Captioning and Subtitling Services

Posts tagged ‘internet captions’

2015 FCC Captions Deadlines

As we usher in a new year, CompuScripts Captioning would like to update our closed captioning clients on changes in regulations regarding Internet video. Internet video programming distributors should already be acquainted with The Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, or CVAA. First implemented in 2012, the CVAA mandates the captions of most Internet video programming. Compliance with the CVAA is monitored by the Federal Communications Commission.

Since March 2012, prerecorded, unedited video programs has required captions when shown for the first time on the Internet. Live programming, near-live programming, and prerecorded, edited programming has required Internet captions since 2013.

In 2014, video programming distributors had 45 days to caption for the Internet previously televised captioned programming. Beginning March 30, 2015, that deadline shrinks to 30 days; for example, a captioned program that is televised on March 30, 2015, must appear with closed captions when shown on the Internet by April 29, 2015. Beginning in 2016, a captioned televised program must appear with captions when shown on the Internet within 15 days to remain compliant.

2015 FCC Mandates

New Year Mandates

CompuScripts Captioning has been working with our clients to ensure compliance with the CVAA since
its implementation in 2012. Previous blogs have addressed Internet captioning regulations and
FCC deadline changes, and future blogs will address changes in the required quality of captions. In addition to Internet video, CompuScripts Captioning offers closed captioning and subtitling services for broadcast and DVD media. Our services are customized for your particular workflow and deliverables, as well as your budget. For assistance on how all of your video programming might meet FCC compliance deadlines, or to request a quote, contact our Caption Coordinator, Stacey Wilson, at swilson@compuscripts.com or 1.888.849.9698.

Internet Captions Decision Reversed in the 9th Circuit

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Internet Captions

After CNN’s motion failed in 2012 to dismiss GLAAD claims under California’s anti-strategic lawsuit against public participation statute, CNN appealed to the Ninth Circuit.  The three federal judges who made up the panel stated, “Numerous recent cases have discussed the DPA’s applicability to virtual spaces like websites, but there is no conclusive California authority on point.”

So now the question is, Will the California Supreme Court weigh in on the GLAAD versus CNN appeal? 

The Internet is a dynamic place where the playing field can be leveled for those seeking and sharing information about any given topic.  It seems only reasonable folks with disabilities are attempting to gain full access to the ever-changing landscape of possibilities we call “the web.”

For a more complete story, be sure to check out this article.

Cochlear Implants and Classroom CART

In our June 2013 blog, we discussed the use of CART, or Communication Access Realtime Translation, by Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing students in college classrooms.  This month, we look at a group of students whose need for CART services might not be immediately apparent:  those with cochlear implants.

Many people incorrectly believe that once a Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing student is fitted with a cochlear implant, hearing is restored, and the need for classroom accommodations disappears.  This belief may be due to a misunderstanding of the difference between hearing aids and cochlear implants.  Hearing aids, which attach to the outer ear, amplify sounds.  Cochlear implants, which are surgically implanted under the skin behind the ear, bypass damaged parts of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders explains how a cochlear implant works:

  1. A microphone picks up sound from the environment.
  2. A speech processor arranges sounds gathered from the microphone.
  3. A transmitter and a receiver/stimulator convert signals from the speech processor into electric impulses.
  4. An electrode relays these electric impulses to the auditory nerve.
Communication

Communication

From there, the impulses travel to the brain, which recognizes them as sound.  This new hearing, however, is different from biologic hearing and takes time to learn.  As the regulatory agency of medical products and procedures, the Food and Drug Administration reminds educators that students need time to adjust to their cochlear implants, and they do so at different rates.  On its website, the FDA states, “During the accommodation period, students need language input from all the sources they used before their implants.”  These may include sign language interpreters, note-takers, or speech-to-text services such as CART.

It is not necessary for the CART provider to be in the classroom with the student.  In this scenario, the classroom instructor wears a wireless microphone during the lecture, and the student’s laptop is connected to the microphone base station.  The student and the CART provider connect via SKYPE, and the highly skilled provider uses a stenomachine as well as special software to convert the instructor’s speech to text. This text is then streamed to an Internet browser-based application, giving the student instant access to the lecture content on his or her laptop.

And students are not the only users of cochlear implants who may benefit from CART services.  CART is frequently used in business meetings, religious services, and medical evaluations by people using cochlear implants.

If you are a student who uses a cochlear implant and are interested in CART accommodation in the classroom, have your college’s disability services office contact CompuScripts Captioning.  If you are a representative of a college disabilities services office and are in need of a CART provider for a student using a cochlear implant, contact CompuScripts Captioning’s president, Deborah Dusseljee, at ddusseljee@compuscripts.com, or call 1.888.849.9698.

CVAA of 2010

Captioning for Internet Videos

The Federal Communications Commission released final rules for implementation of the Twenty-first Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA) on January 13, 2012.  These new rules require video programming owners to send required caption files for IP-delivered video programming to video programming distributors and providers along with program files and set January 13, 2012, as the date to which compliance deadlines are linked.

The FCC defines a video programming owner as “any person or entity that either (i) licenses the video programming to a video programming distributor or provider that makes the video programming available directly to the end user through a distribution method that uses Internet protocol; or (ii) acts as the video programming distributor or provider, and also possesses the right to license the video programming to a video programming distributor or provider that makes the video programming available directly to the end user through a distribution method that uses Internet protocol.”

In issuing final rules, the FCC set the schedule for compliance with the CVAA:

“All prerecorded programming that is not edited for Internet distribution and is subject to the new requirements must be captioned if it is shown on television with captions on or after the date six months after publication of these rules in the Federal Register;”

“All live and near-live programming subject to the new requirements must be captioned if it is shown on television with captions on or after the date 12 months after publication of these rules in the Federal Register;”

“All prerecorded programming that is edited for Internet distribution and is subject to the new requirements must be captioned if it is shown on television with captions on or after the date 18 months after publication of these rules in the Federal Register.”

The FCC also defines the video programming distributor or provider.  For purposes of the CVAA, the VPD or VPP is considered to be “any person or entity that makes video programming available directly to the end user through a distribution method that uses IP.”  Of special interest to the VPD or VPP is the regulation regarding archival programming:

“Archival content must be captioned according to the following deadlines:  Beginning two years after publication of these rules in the Federal Register, all programming that is subject to the new requirements and is already in the video program distributor’s library before it is shown on television with captions must be captioned within 45 days after it is shown on television with captions.  Beginning three years after publication of these rules in the Federal Register, such programming must be captioned within 30 days after it is shown on television with captions.  Beginning four years after publication of these rules in the Federal Register, such programming must be captioned within 15 days after it is shown on television with captions.”

Visit www.fcc.gov for more information.